Showing posts with label strange news 12 February. Show all posts
Showing posts with label strange news 12 February. Show all posts
Driver breaks indoor land speed record in electric Porsche

Driver breaks indoor land speed record in electric Porsche

 

Driver breaks indoor land speed record in electric Porsche

A driver broke the indoor land speed world record when he reached a speed of 102.65 mph in his electric Porsche at a New Orleans convention center.

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Leh Keen, driving an all-electric Taycan Turbo S Porsche, said the car's quick acceleration and powerful brakes were crucial to setting the Guinness World Record for the fastest speed achieved by a vehicle indoors.


Keen said the most complicated part of the record was dealing with the polished concrete floor at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans.


"I didn't really appreciate the scale of the record attempt until my first exploratory run. The surface is so unpredictable, so slick, that you have to have complete trust in your car," Keen said. "It truly was like ice -- and you're accelerating flat out, facing a really hard wall at the end. Suddenly, even in a massive space like the one we had, it seems very small."


He said despite the challenges, he was confident he would beat the record.


"To accelerate so hard on such an erratic surface was incredible. Not for a moment did I doubt I could do it," he said.


Keen's speed of 102.65 mph was enough to beat the previous record of 86.99 mph, which was set by Finnish driver Mikko Hirvonen in 2013.

Scientists share sound of 18,000-year-old wind instrument

Scientists share sound of 18,000-year-old wind instrument

 

Scientists share sound of 18,000-year-old wind instrument

An 18,000-year-old conch shell believed to be the world's oldest instrument of its type was played by a horn player for the first time in thousands of years as part of a study by French scientists.

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Researchers from France's National Center for Scientific Research, the Museum of Toulouse, the University of Toulouse and Quai Branly Museum teamed up to study the shell found at the Marsoulas Cave in the Pyrenees mountain range in 1931.


The scientists, who published their study in the journal Science Advances, said the tip of the conch shell is broken in a way that appears intentional to create a 1.4-inch diameter opening. The team said a study of the opening indicates a mouthpiece may have been attached to the instrument at some time in the past.


The scientists said carbon dating performed on charcoal and bear bone from the same cave indicate the shell is likely about 18,000 years old.


The team recruited a horn player who was able to make sounds with the shell resembling the notes C, C-sharp and D.


Gilles Tosello, co-author of the study and an archaeologist at the University of Toulouse, said the team has not yet determined whether the shell was meant to make music or whether the sounds it made were connected to other rituals.


"It could have been used as a communication tool," he told CNN.


Tosello said the scientists are now working on a 3D replica of the shell to learn more about the shell and the sounds it can make.